Brazilian Journal of medical and biological research

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Effect of strontium ranelate on pain behavior in an experimental model of osteoarthritis

Rodrigues, T.A.; Sampaio Junior, A.J.B.; Nunes, I.D.P.; Cartágenes, M.S.S.; Garcia, J.B.S.

Strontium ranelate (SrRan) is a drug usually prescribed to treat osteoporosis, with proven effects of decreasing the risk of fractures and an indication of reducing the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). This study aimed to investigate the effects of SrRan as either a prophylactic or a treatment drug, using an OA rat model to assess pain behavior. A monoiodoacetate (MIA)-induced knee joint OA model in Wistar rats was used. Thirty Wistar rats (both sexes, 60 days old) were distributed in five groups of 6 rats each: the control group, that received no intervention; a prophylactic group, that received oral administration of 25 mg·kg-1·day-1 of SrRan for 28 days before induction of OA; a group treated with 25 mg·kg-1·day-1 of SrRan for 28 days after OA induction; a group treated with 50 mg·kg-1·day-1 during 28 days after OA induction; and a group that received oral saline for 28 days after induction. The assessment of pain behavior was performed considering articular incapacitation (weight-bearing test), mechanical hyperalgesia (Randall Selitto test) and motor activity (rotarod test), on days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28. This experiment did not yield a significant difference when comparing the group that received SrRan prophylactically with the groups treated with 25 or 50 mg·kg-1·day-1 and the group that received oral saline. Thus, SrRan did not provide analgesia in either treated rats or as a prophylactic drug with the tested doses. Higher doses should be tested further to achieve possible significant results.}gt;Strontium ranelate (SrRan) is a drug usually prescribed to treat osteoporosis, with proven effects of decreasing the risk of fractures and an indication of reducing the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). This study aimed to investigate the effects of SrRan as either a prophylactic or a treatment drug, using an OA rat model to assess pain behavior. A monoiodoacetate (MIA)-induced knee joint OA model in Wistar rats was used. Thirty Wistar rats (both sexes, 60 days old) were distributed in five groups of 6 rats each: the control group, that received no intervention; a prophylactic group, that received oral administration of 25 mg·kg-1·day-1 of SrRan for 28 days before induction of OA; a group treated with 25 mg·kg-1·day-1 of SrRan for 28 days after OA induction; a group treated with 50 mg·kg-1·day-1 during 28 days after OA induction; and a group that received oral saline for 28 days after induction. The assessment of pain behavior was performed considering articular incapacitation (weight-bearing test), mechanical hyperalgesia (Randall Selitto test) and motor activity (rotarod test), on days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28. This experiment did not yield a significant difference when comparing the group that received SrRan prophylactically with the groups treated with 25 or 50 mg·kg-1·day-1 and the group that received oral saline. Thus, SrRan did not provide analgesia in either treated rats or as a prophylactic drug with the tested doses. Higher doses should be tested further to achieve possible significant results.

Keywords: Osteoarthritis; Strontium ranelate; Pain; Treatment; Prophylaxis




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